Top 100 analyst blogs

18Feb08

top100 The business case for blogging is something that many firms are still mooting. It would appear that this is also the situation for analyst firms – in an industry where opinion is a sought after commodity, it is no wonder that many companies are unsure whether to give away their IP in this format.

Nevertheless, some people and striving ahead in this field as their readership soars and the number of people linking to their blogs increases. Below is the list of the top 100 analyst blogs as

determined by PageRank, subscribers, recent inbound links, frequency and focus of posts as well as the number of comments.

Congratulations to those who made the top 100.

    Google PageRank image Technorati Technobabble 2.0 Total score
1 Web Strategy by Jeremiah 10 30 29 19 88
2 Compete Blog 12 30 26 19 87
3 James Governor’s MonkChips 14 29 19 19 80
4 The Groundswell 12 29 24 15 79
5 Message 12 24 24 19 79
6 tecosystems 12 29 17 17 75
7 CMS Watch Trends and Features 12 30 18 13 73
8 People Over Process 12 27 16 17 72
9 Being Peter Kim 10 23 18 17 68
10 Collaborative Thinking 10 26 16 16 68
11 Forrester’s Marketing Blog 12 21 19 13 65
12 Service-Oriented Architecture 14 18 17 15 64
13 Securosis.com 10 23 16 15 63
14 Dean Bubley’s Disruptive Wireless 10 18 14 19 61
15 James Bach’s Blog 10 26 13 12 61
16 451 CAOS Theory 10 18 15 17 60
17 JupiterResearch  - Michael Gartenberg 12 17 17 13 59
18 isen.blog 12 17 16 13 58
19 StorageMojo 12 20 14 12 58
20 Hitwise Intelligence – Bill Tancer 10 17 17 13 57
21 From Information to Knowledge Management 12 18 14 12 56
22 Identity and Privacy Strategies Blog 12 14 14 16 56
23 Kelsey Group Blogs 10 17 14 15 55
24 MacehiterWard-Dutton 12 17 12 15 55
25 Jon Arnold’s Blog 12 17 13 13 55
26 Always On Real-Time Access 10 18 12 15 55
27 Contentblogger(TM) – News Commentary 12 17 14 12 55
28 Customer Experience Matters 10 17 14 13 54
29 DBMS2 12 17 13 12 54
30 Security Incite 10 11 15 17 53
31 The Net-Savvy Executive 8 18 14 12 52
32 IDC eXchange 12 18 10 12 52
33 Rob Enderle 12 11 14 15 51
34 Virtually Speaking 14 6 14 16 50
35 Dana Gardner’s BriefingsDirect 14 8 16 12 50
36 JupiterResearch  - David Card 12 9 15 13 49
37 Text Technologies 10 15 11 13 49
38 Hitwise Intelligence – Heather Hopkins UK 12 8 15 15 49
39 The Enterprise System Spectator 12 12 12 12 48
40 Peter O’Kelly’s Reality Check 12 8 13 15 47
41 Illuminata Perspectives 12 14 11 11 47
42 Technology Pundits 10 18 8 11 47
43 Parks Associates 10 14 10 12 46
44 Open Source Unleashed – All Bets Off 12 9 12 12 45
45 Brandon Hall Analyst Blog – Janet Clarey 10 3 13 19 45
46 Application Platform Strategies Blog 10 12 12 11 45
47 Richi Blog 8 11 10 16 45
48 elemental links 10 14 10 11 44
49 Brandon Hall Analyst Blog – Tom Werner 10 12 10 12 44
50 Hitwise Intelligence – Robin Goad 10 6 17 11 44
51 BlogERP – Jim Holincheck’s HCM Software 10 9 11 13 43
52 Tech – Surf – Blog 10 5 14 15 43
53 Security and Risk Management 12 9 10 12 43
54 BriefingsDirect Transcripts 12 9 10 12 43
55 Contentblogger(TM) – Industry Events 10 17 7 9 43
56 Pattern Finder 10 6 13 13 42
57 JupiterResearch  - Julie Ask 12 6 11 13 42
58 Z Trek: The Alan Zeichick  12 6 12 12 42
59 JupiterResearch  - Mark Mulligan 12 6 13 11 42
60 JupiterResearch  - David Schatsky 12 11 11 8 42
61 Cutter Blog 10 11 9 12 42
62 THINK IT Services 8 11 12 11 41
63 Irwin Lazar’s Real-time Blog 12 5 11 13 41
64 What’s on Tonight? 14 9 8 9 40
65 Greenmonk 8 6 10 16 40
66 Teblog 10 6 10 13 39
67 Amy Wohl’s  12 11 10 7 39
68 i-mode Business Strategy 12 14 7 7 39
69 BizTech Talk 10 6 11 12 39
70 KnowledgeForward 10 6 11 12 39
71 Security and Risk Management Strategies 10 5 11 13 39
72 Web Globalization News 10 6 12 11 39
73 Judith Hurwitz’ Weblog 10 6 12 11 39
74 Hitwise Intelligence – Sandra Hanchard 10 3 11 15 39
75 Travel Technology 10 9 9 11 39
76 Ceci N’est Pas Un Bob 12 5 11 11 38
77 The Collaboration Blog 10 11 8 9 38
78 Amy Wohl’s Opinions on SaaS 12 6 9 11 38
79 Gilbane Group Blog 12 2 12 12 38
80 Data Center Strategies Blog 10 5 11 12 38
81 JupiterResearch  - Nate Elliott 12 3 11 11 37
82 A Software Insider’s Point of View 10 3 10 13 36
83 Freeform Comment 10 2 10 15 36
84 Steve’s IT Rants 8 9 12 7 36
85 Collaboration and Content Strategies Blog 8 5 11 12 36
86 JupiterResearch  - Ian Fogg 12 2 10 12 36
87 BriefingsDirect 8 8 8 12 36
88 TeleGeography News and Analysis 12 5 7 12 36
89 E-Communications and Community 10 5 10 11 35
90 doingITbetter 10 6 8 11 35
91 Dan Keldsen 10 2 11 12 35
92 Richard Nantel 10 5 8 12 35
93 Analyst Blogs – Dave Mercer 8 3 7 16 34
94 JupiterResearch  - Barry Parr 12 2 8 12 34
95 The Monash Report 10 5 8 11 33
96 Out of the Box 6 6 9 12 33
97 Ironick 10 3 8 12 33
98 Horses for Sources 8 2 10 13 33
99 Yankee Group Blog 10 5 6 12 33
100 Enterprise Search Blog 12 2 9 9 32

Blogs that didn’t make the top 100 but are worth watching:  Birdahonk, A Springboard to Services, Robin Bloor’s Blog: have Mac will blog, Holway’s HotViews and Keeping IT Grounded. These blogs are relatively new and probably would feature higher if their Google PageRank was up-to-date.

Thoughts

When I first compiled the list if top analyst blogs, I was at surprised at the sheer quantity out there and yet also shocked at how some of the larger ‘Tier 1′ firms have taken only tentative steps in this space. What can be seen though is that the blogs that tend to be most successful have a few underlying themes, namely:

  1. Topics – analysts who specialise in social media unsurprisingly dominate the top 10.
  2. Companies – firms like Forrester, RedMonk continue to have a loud voice. Whereas IDC and Gartner fail to have a regular dialogue
  3. People – individuals like Jeremiah Owyang (new entry at number 1 – well done) are bigger than the firms they are part of.
  4. Comments – one of the main differences between offline and online media is the ability to have conversations with an audience. Analyst reports are typical of this one-way dialogue. It is surprising therefore when companies such as Jupiter (who have 23 bloggers) don’t allow their readers to get involved.
  5. Frequency and focus – last year Gartner predicted that “that the number of active bloggers would hit its all-time high in 2007, levelling out soon thereafter”. There is some truth in this – whilst compiling this league table it was evident that some blogs that previously made the top 100 hadn’t been updated for well over 2 months. I have scored blogs higher if they stay relevant and posts are made frequently.

Methodology

Google PageRank (0 to 10) – Google PageRank is a link analysis algorithm that interprets web links and assigns a numerical weighting (0 to 10) to each site. High-quality sites receive a higher PageRank. The ranking uses the actual PageRank as part of its algorithm.

Google Reader Subscribers (0 to 10) – Google reader lists the total number of subscribers to a blog. I believe this is a more realistic number to that which Bloglines provides. Mihai Parparita confirms that “these numbers include subscribers across all Google services”. To account for people using other readers (e.g. Newsgator) it has been suggested that this number is multiplied by 3. Subscriber ranges were determined (i.e. more than 20, more than 30, etc.) and each range was assigned a number (0 to 20) that was used as part of the algorithm.

Technorati Ranking (0 to 10) – Technorati ranking relates the authority of a particular blog (via the number of sites pointing to it). The more link sources referencing your blog, the higher the Technorati ranking. Similar to the Google Reader Subscribers value, and each range was assigned a number (0 to 30) that was used as part of the algorithm. Where people scored the same total score, the blog that had the highest Technorati authority gained the higher ranking.

Technobabble Points (0 to 10) – As the only personal subjective measure in the algorithm, 0 to 10 opinion points were assigned to each blog. I value frequent, relevant, creative and high-quality content with a good number of comments.

Weighting - Each specific variable listed above was given a standard score out of 10. Using a weighting scale I varied the importance of the each metric to establish a blogs total score. For the table listed above the following weightings were used:

        Google PageRank 20%
        Google Reader Subscribers 30%
        Technorati 30%
        Technobabble (content/frequency/comments) 20%

              Additional reading: Analyst blogging – is it worth it?

              This league table was inspired by Todd And’s Power 150, a ranking of the top English-language marketing blogs developed by Todd Andrlik. My thanks to Tekrati for use of their blog directory.

              Badges:

              rank1 top5 top10

              top50  top100

               

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              42 Responses to “Top 100 analyst blogs”

              1. Jonny – ah, the wonder of google alerts, found me here on your page. Thanks very much for the inclusion, glad I’m up above the chasm and being found useful.

                Would measurement by feedburner stats (if available) make any difference to the ranking?

                And I’ll strive to rank higher in the Technobabble column, although my definition of Technobabble would be the exact opposite of what I try to get across. :D

                BTW – as with you, I don’t understand firms that don’t allow reader commentary. It’s hardly a read-write web if you don’t allow others to write…

                Cheers,
                Dan

              2. Thanks for your comment Dan. If Feedburner stats were made public (instead of only being available to the author) then this would be great. In their absence I have chosen to use Google Reader stats which according to those in the know is about as close as you can get to get a good idea. The key thing is that the same tool is used for all so the pro’s and con’s are the same for everyone.

                And yes, why doesn’t everyone allow comments?

              3. JB: Great study and adds a lot of sense to the swirl of blog-info out there from analysts. Hat-tip to you, especially the fact you put a lot of thought into a solid methodology, while still adding your own personal subjective score. My only question to you is the level of weight assigned to “Google Reader” subscriptions. From my experience, if people want to access a blog regularly, they subscribe via email, or run an RSS feed into Feedblitz or Feedburner. Yes, many people use a Google reader on Google homepages, but I wouldn’t make this my top indicator for blog subscribers.

                Another thing that would be very cool is to view by blog-focus. As you accurately point-out, edgy tech areas like social media dominate blogging behaviour – not surprising when followers of social-media issues tend to be the most blog-savvy customers. Other business-focused issues like outsourcing and IT services are dominating the CIO and CFO agenda, and it’s far more challenging to get senior execs who are more business than tech-focused using blogs. That is why the direct email subsciption method works for these folks – they understand how to pick up blog feeds on email, whereas the concept of having a Google reader is still pretty foreign to them.

                Also – kudos to Barbara at Tekrati for making the effort to track all these blogs.

                PF.

              4. Thanks Phil. You raise two interesting points that I have battled with myself.

                Firstly – how do you measure readership numbers?
                Until the feedburner data (which measures readership from multiple sources including emails subs) or similar alternative becomes available to everyone, we will continue to be in the situation where it is difficult to gauge the true level of subscribers. I currently believe that the numbers Google Reader provides are the most consistent across all blogs – even though they are not a true number (most people estimate that they are approx 1/3 of the ‘real’ number) they are as good as I can feasibly get. As long as this number is used for everyone then at least everyone is judged the same.

                Secondly – why not add categories to each blog?
                I started doing this. At first it was quite simple – and then it became increasingly complicated. Unfortunately, it was proving very difficult to categorise an individual blog (for example, do they focus on social media or marketing, SOA or enterprise software, emerging technology or technology trends?). Perhaps next time I will take another stab at it.

              5. I’ve spent the better part of two hours going through some of these excellent sites. Thanks for composing this fine list.

              6. Would love to be on this list one day.

              7. thanks, Jonny, for your good work….

                cheers,
                Graeme
                http://www.tech-surf-blog.com

              8. Great work, and I enjoy the rounded methodology you used, better than the typical ‘incoming links’ authority.

                I must admit however, that the relationship is really symbiotic, I’ve now access to some of the top brands as clients, the top tier media companies and press, and data and research than I’ve never seen before, so I’m very appreciative to the new resources that are at my disposal –it’s a collaborative effort between myself and Forrester.

                Thanks again for creating such a wonderful industry index, I will try to live up to the ranking.

              9. Jonny:

                Guaging “visitor interaction”

                One more question I have – is there a way to guage the amount of comments-per-post bloggers receive? There are some blogs on here that seem to perform pooly when it comes to getting actual comments and interaction/debate on their sites. Hence, while they may have done a good job getting linked to other sites and attracting visibility there seems to be very limited interaction on the sites themselves, which makes you wonder whether people are actually reading the content on them…

                Phil.

              10. Jonny,

                Great job again! Per our earlier exchange, I’ll be loading the last 3 rounds of rankings into the Tekrati blogs directory.

                In reading the comments, I wanted to reiterate that sorting by topic is a tough nut to crack. I have not seen a useful way to accommodate it, and it makes much more sense for me and my readers, in the context of a directory, than for you and your readers, in the context of a top 100 ranking. For one thing, it’s dynamic — topics change constantly, even within a theme. That means manual tagging is out of the question; it has to be auto-generated from the blogs. Also, there’s no consensus on the best taxonomy, e.g. Technorati keywords vs. blog-defined tags and categories.

                I settled on customizing a Google-Coop free-text search of the analyst blogs, per Mike Gotta’s example. You’ve already blogged about the pro’s and con’s on that sort of tool.

                I’m honored that you use the Tekrati directory as part of this program. Thanks for that, and helping promote my efforts along with your own.

                As always,
                Barbara

              11. Hi Jonny:

                Thanks for your work publishing this ranking — and especially for making your methodology so objective and transparent. We are obviously pleased to make the list — and expect to be moving up the rankings as we are in the process of engaging more of our analysts in our public-facing blog.

                Yankee Group encourages our clients to use tools like blogs in order to engage with their customers more effectively. Last summer, we launched our blog to carry dispatches from CEO Emily Green’s “Anywhere Tour” — a 12-city speaking tour taking our vision of the manifold implications of the global bandwidth revolution and ubiquitous connectivity to audiences around the globe.

                Our blog will continue to carry Emily’s posts, but just this week, analysts Josh Martin and (former blogger himself) Dan Taylor kicked off our expanded blogging efforts. I hope you stop by and join in on the conversation.

                Thanks,

                Jeffrey Breen
                Chief Technology Officer
                Yankee Group Research

                http://www.yankeegroup.com/

                http://blogs.yankeegroup.com/

              12. Nice list again.

                However, I was dismayed to find out my blog, DVR Bulletin (http://www.dvrbulletin.com), didn’t make it back into the ratings this time.

                True, I was number 98 last time but I was proud nonetheless. (See my post at: http://dvrbulletin.com/dvr-bulletin-among-top-100-analyst-blogs/)

                I guess I must have dropped off.

                Perhaps my other blog, Digital Media Bulletin (http://www.digitalmediabulletin.com), would have scored higher since it has more Technorati points and subscribers.

                Being an analyst for hire (or independent analyst), it’s a really different ball game compared to the big name analyst firms.

                Anyway, always interesting to read the list and see who’s on top. And I’ll strive to make my way up the charts again!

                Jose Alvear
                IPTV Analyst
                Multimedia Research Group
                http://www.mrgco.com

              13. By the way, I love the addition of the buttons so people can post them on their blogs. Nice touch!

                Jose Alvear
                IPTV Analyst
                http://www.mrgco.com

              14. Thanks for including us in your analysis. Best wishes.

              15. 15 Tony

                Very nice list but you have duplicates… for example, #69 and #91 are the same blog. Interesting that the scores were different for the two. Very useful info though…

              16. Hi Tony

                Glad you like the list and thanks for pointing out the duplicate – it looks as though I had this blog down twice with different references and on the two times I checked the subscriber numbers it produced different figures (the other numbers are the same). This is a known problem with sub numbers – in fact when i first published the list in June 07 it stopped Charlene Li taking the top spot until it was later fixed.

                Cheers, Jonny

              17. 17 alex

                Hi

                What would be really helpful is if the top bloggers just open-sourced their design and content shell of their blog, and the blogging provider ( word-press ; bloggr etc… ) then told those of us who do not blog, here are, like, 100 ” shells “, look at them, choose the best one and go use it.

                Then it would have all the techy nonsense done for you, the RSS, the leave a comment and other barriers to entry removed, and hey presto the web could open its doors to all of us.

                It is a real pain being a web user but not being able to copy and paste good work. Do you think you can e-mail your top 100 blogs and ask them if they will make their design and shell open to all of us as a straw-man we can then plug and play ?

              18. I just added an artcle on how “Blog-culture is ripping up the rule book for the outsourcing services and technology industry”:

                http://fersht.typepad.com/the_outsourcing_bloghorse/2008/03/how-is-the-blog.html

                Phil.

              19. Great list. Found some I’d never heard of. Any chance you could offer an opml file of the sites?

              20. I like the idea of this list for the sole reason that it segments analyst blogs from others. And it makes sense to remove Digg from the criteria. That said, there are some underlying issues with such a ranking.

                1. In measuring popularity, we don’t know where the hits come from. For example, the top-ranked blog is Jeremiah Owyang’s. I read through his interesting blog and stumbled on this in his entry on how he uses Twitter, which states, in part: “5) Traffic driving tool: I use it to direct people to this blog, sometimes (I’ll admit) a bit too enthusiastically. Google Analytics indicates this is one of the largest referrers of folks to my blog.” So while Jeremiah writes about social computing, much of the traffic to his site, at least at the time, came from his traffic tips. Good if you’re in San Francisco and drive to work.

                2. Frequency of update varies over time. For example, one blog on the list, #78 Amy Wohl’s Opinions on SaaS, has the last entry dated July 8, 2008. Amy writes a lot (3 blogs according to her Web site), has a lot of experience, is respected in the industry, and is intelligent. Yet for some reason she’s not writing the SaaS blog anymore and it won’t likely make the next version of this list. That doesn’t mean Amy’s not worth listening to. People take vacations, have family issues, work pressures. Lapses do not mean they are not worth reading. Perhaps longevity of the blog should be an additional criteria.

                3. Analysts aren’t the only bloggers with intelligent voices on technology happenings. Many vendors have excellent bloggers, and end users provide solid perspectives too. The media blogs too, of course. People looking for information and opinions on technology in the blogosphere don’t necessarily default to analysts. I do think vendors watch the analyst blogs closely to see what analysts might say about their companies in the same way they read analyst reports.

                4. Some analyst groups have yet to blog much. Does that make them bad analysts? No. Some meet face to face with their clients to add value at seminars and events. Many provide Webinars and conference calls. Most provide written research reports in other forms. Blogging is but one element of delivering information to clients. And some analysts have clients who don’t read blogs, so for them to extend effort there makes little sense.

                5. While blog traffic is straightforward to measure, quality of entries is not. One can not assume that there is a direct relationship between blog hits and quality. There can be, yet it should not be assumed. The ranking implies higher is better. Higher on the list simply means more activity.

                I hope Technobabble readers keep these caveats in mind when reviewing the list.


              1. 1 links for 2008-02-18
              2. 2 People Over Process » links for 2008-02-19
              3. 3 The importance of blogging
              4. 4 Keeping Tabs » Blog Archive » Jonny Bentwood’s Top 100 Analyst Blogs
              5. 5 StorageMojo » StorageMojo update
              6. 6 Out of the Box » Blog Archive » Out of the Box again named a Top 100 Analyst Blog
              7. 7 Always On Real-Time Access » Top 100 analyst blogs
              8. 8 Because analysts are increasingly using blogs as development platforms AR has to participate to be part of the conversation « SageCircle Blog
              9. 9 Топ 100 на аналитичните блогове
              10. 10 Bloggers vs. Analysts: opening a discussion : Analyst Equity
              11. 11 Futter für den Feedreader - 15 Ressourcen für gehaltvolle Blogs « c/o operative
              12. 12 Boomerang » Blog Archive » Ultimate Blog Lists
              13. 13 1 year old today « Technobabble 2.0
              14. 14 Top analyst twitters / micro-bloggers « Technobabble 2.0
              15. 15 What do you think Compete does?
              16. 16 Steps for AR teams for starting with analyst blogs « SageCircle Blog
              17. 17 AR 2.0 at Forrester IT Forum « Technobabble 2.0
              18. 18 Mary S. Butler » Blog Archive » May issue of Headlightblog.com gets a plug from the web strategist
              19. 19 links for 2008-07-30 | Thought Stream: Nitin Badjatia's Weblog
              20. 20 Top 100 Tech Analyst Blogs | Digital Swimming
              21. 21 What blogging can do for you (besides money) | Chilly Cool Blogger Resources
              22. 22 Jeremiah Owyang- Analyst & Partner @ Altimeter Group | Fanplayr

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