Top analyst twitters / micro-bloggers… updated

05May08

image

Edit: 12 May: updated with 10 additional analysts

After I published the top analyst twitters last week, I am pleased to say there has been a surge of activity amongst the analyst community regarding who twitters and how they use it. I have now updated the table below to take the new players into consideration. Carter has kept his fantastic directory up-to-date and I have used this as a basis for who should be included.

Below this table I have also compiled some of the comments and anecdotes that people have made regarding how they use this tool as part of their job.

Firm Analyst image image image image image
1 Forrester Jeremiah Owyang 30 15 30 25 100
2 Message Stowe Boyd 29 15 30 25 99
3 Redmonk James Governor 27 15 30 25 97
4 Redmonk Michael Cote 26 15 30 25 96
5 Redmonk Steve O’Grady 22 15 19 25 81
6 AMR Research Jonathon Yarmis 21 14 29 16 80
7 Jupiter Research Michael Gartenberg 22 14 29 15 80
8 The451 Raven Zachary 23 15 19 20 77
9 IDC Rachel Happe 19 13 18 23 72
10 Forrester Charlene Li 28 9 18 16 71
11 Aite Ron Shevlin * 14 15 29 13 70
12 Forrester Josh Bernoff 24 10 18 18 70
13 Forrester Peter Kim 25 12 13 18 68
14 Monash Research Curt Monash 25 14 13 15 67
15 AIIM Market Intel. Dan Keldsen 19 14 16 18 66
16 Ovum David Mitchell 19 10 13 19 61
17 Burton Group Mike Gotta 16 11 19 14 60
18 Tech~Surf~Blog Graeme Thickins 16 12 13 19 60
19 Gartner Thomas Otter 16 13 16 15 60
20 Freeform Dynamics Jon Collins 15 13 16 14 57
21 Interarbor Dana Gardner 17 8 14 18 57
22 Gartner Ray Valdes 19 8 14 13 54
23 Gartner Jeff Mann 14 9 14 15 52
24 The451 Vishy Venugopalan 14 12 16 10 52
25 Freeform Dynamics David Tebbutt 16 10 14 10 50
26 Freeform Dynamics Dale Vile 13 9 16 13 50
27 SiriusDecisions Jonathan Block 14 8 13 14 49
28 AMR Research Phil Fersht 15 9 11 9 43
29 Forrester Event Handle 27 9 0 6 42
30 Accendor Bruce Stewart 13 9 7 13 42
31 Gartner Andreas Bitterer 10 7 12 13 41
32 Elemental Links Brenda Michelson 12 9 11 9 41
33 Clew David Carpe 11 7 10 13 40
34 Illuminata Jonathan Eunice 10 7 5 18 39
35 Berlecon Research PhilippBohn 9 7 7 14 36
36 NPD Ross Rubin 11 7 2 14 34
37 Forrester Merv Adrian 9 6 11 6 32
38 Patricia Seybold Group Patricia Seybold 9 6 5 13 32
39 Hurwitz & Associates Judith Hurwitz 13 4 8 6 32
40 Gartner Andrew Frank 9 6 7 8 30
41 MWD Neil Ward-Dutton 9 6 7 6 28
42 Gartner Allen Weiner 12 8 4 4 27
43 Hurwitz & Associates Robin Bloor 10 4 7 5 26
44 Bathwick Group Gary Barnett 10 7 0 8 25
45 Freeform Dynamics Martin Atherton 7 2 1 13 22
46 Gartner Mike McGuire 9 5 2 6 22
47 Jupiter Research Barry Parr 10 4 4 5 22
48 NPD Sam Bhavnani 8 5 2 6 22
49 IDC Frank Gens 9 5 2 4 20
50 Gartner Gene Phifer 12 5 0 3 20
51 Gartner David M. Smith 11 2 1 4 17
52 Gartner Dan Sholler * 4 5 0 8 17
53 Gartner Yefim Natis 6 3 0 1 10
54 Entiva Group Alex Fletcher 3 0 0 6 9
55 IDC IdaRose Sylvester 2 4 1 1 8
56 Quocirca Dennis Szubert 6 0 2 0 8
57 Butler Roy Illsley 2 1 1 4 7
58 Illuminata Gordon Haff 3 3 1 0 7
59 Gartner Tole Hart 6 0 0 0 6

* Updates protected – average Technobabble score given based upon Follower/Update ratio

Analyst comments:

Jeremiah Owyang:

It’s important for people to know that using Twitter actually helps me with my analysis, I’ve a direct connection with the marketplace that I cover (social computing) and I’m able to find out information at rapid speed, as well as deliver information.

I would guess I have over 100 clients who are on twitter, and we’re building relationships, sharing, and learning about each other.

Peter Kim:

I have to give points to The Guv’nor – a few months ago, I was showing Twitter to a client and he offered his services to them as an alternative.

Rachel Happe:

I’ve found Twitter to be immensely valuable in understanding the state of the conversation in the space I am covering (social media technologies), getting to know people, finding inspiration, getting feedback, and highlighting (occasionally) some of my work.

Sam Bhavnani:

As work life and personal life blend into one, more and more I’m finding twitter to be an effective means of communication. Clients also seem to appreciate being able to reach you easily through whichever connection medium they find easiest at the time, whether its text message, facebook, twitter, phone call, or email.

Dean Bubley:

While I’m absolutely certain of the value of blogging as an analyst, I’m much less convinced by the Twitter proposition. Apart from a few of my clients in the wireless VoIP / Mobile Web 2.0 application area, I’m not aware that most of my contacts (primarily in the mobile industry) use or read microblogging in any form whatsoever. Also, nobody in my social circle has ever mentioned it at all, and I see no reason to play the evangelist.

Patty Seybold:

Count me in–When I noticed that my clients were twittering to the world from our seminars, I wanted in! Now we can thought-provoke one another and keep track… It’s a mini-support network…and having access to the other analysts’ who are out there covering meetings, trade shows, and breaking news, makes it easy to track the pulse!

More comments can be found on SageCircle’s blog on this topic

Analysis

It is not a massive shock that the people who have scored highest are the same as those who use blogging to great affect. Nevertheless, special mention should be given to Jeremiah Owyang, Stowe Boyd and the entire RedMonk crew for showing the world how Twitter can best be used.

Perhaps the biggest shock is that there are only 49 analyst twitters out there. Maybe I have drank too much kool aid but I would be surprised if this number doesn’t increase dramatically over the next year. Perhaps the other change would be that the tool of choice has evolved from Twitter to another media.

Methodology

Followers (0 to 30) – Twitter lists the number of followers each user has. Like subscribing to a feed, this is a clear indication of importance as it requires someone to actively request participation. Follower ranges were determined (i.e. more than 20, more than 30, etc.) and each range was assigned a number (0 to 25) that was used as part of the algorithm.

Updates (0 to 30) – How often does someone update what they are doing. This number is purely objective as it scores someone highly no matter what the content of their post (i.e. how relevant is it). Nevertheless it is assumed that if someone posts frequently but has poor content then their ‘followers’ will decrease. Update ranges were determined (i.e. more than 20, more than 30, etc.) and each range was assigned a number (0 to 25) that was used as part of the algorithm.

Conversation (0 to 40) – How many people engage in conversation with you. The clearest way to establish this is to run a search on the number of people who reference @username in a message. This calculation is based upon a 30 day period between 1 April and 1 May 2008. The number of times this happens is calculated with each range was assigned a number (0 to 25) – again this was then used as part of the algorithm.

Technobabble Points (0 to 20) – As the only personal subjective measure in the algorithm, 0 to 25 opinion points were assigned to each blog. People who scored highest in this category had frequent, relevant and high-quality content (asking questions, posting links or commenting on discussions). Please note that I have not scored people low by not having exclusive analyst-focused content as the very nature of Twitter is to engage in off-topic discussions. I also am fully cognisant that some people use Twitter in different ways (such as posting links, asking questions etc) – this ranking recognises the value of each and scores people accordingly.

Weighting - Each specific variable listed above was given a standard score out of 10. Using a weighting scale I varied the importance of the each metric to establish a blogs total score. For the table listed above the following weightings were used:

Followers 30%
Updates 15%
Conversations 30%
Technobabble 25%

This ranking system is not meant to be a score based on someone’s ‘popularity’. I have taken careful consideration of the analysts participation into the community and the corresponding willingness of third parties to engage. As with my other posts, this league table is not an end in itself and I hope to gain valuable feedback to understand how I can make this more valid.

About these ads


42 Responses to “Top analyst twitters / micro-bloggers… updated”

  1. Johnny, thanks again for including me in this list.

    It’s important for people to know that using Twitter actually helps me with my analysis, I’ve a direct connection with the marketplace that I cover (social computing) and I’m able to find out information at rapid speed, as well as deliver information.

    I would guess I have over 100 clients who are on twitter, and we’re building relationships, sharing, and learning about each other.

    Lastly, I should add, it’s just damn fun.

    Thanks again, Jeremiah (BTW my last name is spelled very interestingly)

  2. Hello JB – long time no talk – it’s been a while since we had that roundtable in NY, let’s do it again soon! I saw a steady stream of new followers this a.m., now I know why.

    My favorite part of your analysis is the Conversation component – arguably the most important element of a social computing tool and the point of the whole microblogging thing (for most people).

    I have to give points to The Guv’nor – a few months ago, I was showing Twitter to a client and he offered his services to them as an alternative.

    Looking forward to the continued conversation – Peter Kim [Forrester]

  3. Johnny

    Great list. I posted it on my twitter account to share with all on my list of analysts and techno-geeks :)

    very informative! great job!

  4. Hi –

    Got here from JO’s twitter stream.

    Just wanted to add that Dion Hinchcliffe (http://twitter.com/dhinchcliffe) was one of my best twitter reads. He’s not 100% an analyst though… ;-)

    Julien

  5. Thanks Jonny!

    If your readers are in San Francisco and would like to talk about twitter and how its useful with other practioners we’ll be running a session today at the Moscone center, at the free redmonk unconference, hosted by Sun Microsystems.

  6. Hi Jonny –

    Appreciate your inclusion of me in this list – I’ve found Twitter to be immensely valuable in understanding the state of the conversation in the space I am covering (social media technologies), getting to know people, finding inspiration, getting feedback, and highlighting (occasionally) some of my work.

    Thanks for the list – I like the measures you’ve used.

    Cheers –

    Rachel

  7. Fascinating list as always. It appears real analysts do Twitter .

  8. Saying “Real Analysts don’t Twitter” is also saying that “Real Analysts don’t Email”

    Saying a profession does or does not communicate should be based upon first looking to see if your marketplace is using these tools. If yes, there’s some pretty logical applications that take place.

    Therefore, real analysts communicate with their market.

  9. It’s always refreshing to see folks building a measurement framework around social media tools. I’m finding Twitter to be a great “ear to the crowd” tool as well as an effective avenue for generating questions.

  10. As work life and personal life blend into one, more and more I’m finding twitter to be an effective means of communication. Clients also seem to appreciate being able to reach you easily through whichever connection medium they find easiest at the time, whether its text message, facebook, twitter, phone call, or email.

  11. While I’m absolutely certain of the value of blogging as an analyst, I’m much less convinced by the Twitter proposition. Apart from a few of my clients in the wireless VoIP / Mobile Web 2.0 application area, I’m not aware that most of my contacts (primarily in the mobile industry) use or read microblogging in any form whatsoever. Also, nobody in my social circle has ever mentioned it at all, and I see no reason to play the evangelist.

    In general, I also have to say that I am a complete disbeliever in linking work and personal contacts and social network tools – especially things like FaceBook.

  12. 12 jeff mann

    Thanks for the analysis and the mention. Always great to squeak into the top anything. I’ll take 20.

  13. Count me in–When I noticed that my clients were twittering to the world from our seminars, I wanted in! Now we can thought-provoke one another and keep track…

    It’s a mini-support network…and having access to the other analysts’ who are out there covering meetings, trade shows, and breaking news, makes it easy to track the pulse!

  14. Hi Jonny, Another high quality piece of research.

    As the comments reflect, there is a broad set of perspectives about whether Twitter or other forms of micro-blogging is a good tool for analysts and analyst relations (AR). I did a survey of the then Twittering analysts a few weeks back and got some interesting results, which you find here:

    http://sagecircle.wordpress.com/2008/04/07/sagecircle-survey-the-tech-industry-analysts-on-twitter/

    I need to update the survey seeing how the Analyst Twitter Directory has doubled in size since that first survey was sent. How quickly it grows. >>grin<<

    cheers, -carter j

  15. great list, Jonny — thanks for putting this together!

    but, of course, I Twittered it before I posted my comment :-)

    regards,
    Graeme

  16. Great to see this list — I look forward to exploring a few of these I haven’t seen before. It looks like SageCircle is missing a few Jupiter analysts from their list — maybe you can add @nate_elliott, @dschatsky, and @ianfogg42 to the mix for your next update? Thanks.

  17. Thanks Nate – will make sure the Jupiter crew are included next time round. As this is an ‘interactive’ tool, does that mean Jupiter are now changing their ways and may now allow comments on your blogs too?

  18. I hope so. As I understand it, the reason we don’t have comments enabled isn’t because we’re afraid of interactivity — after all, we were one of the first firms to blog, with comments initially enabled, and at least a half-dozen of our analysts use Twitter as well — but because when we did have comments enabled, we had significant problems with spam. But a few of us have been pushing internally for the reintroduction of comments, so hopefully we can make that happen.

  19. 19 Gerry Van Zandt

    Good stuff.

    One thing — let’s use the correct term … it’s not called (as a verb) “twittering” or (plural noun) “twitters”.

    Rather, people should use the following correct terms: (verb) “tweeting”; and individual broacast messages are referred to as (plural noun) “tweets”

  20. Thanks Gerry

    I will edit the post with the correct terms shortly. Meanwhile – can you help me define the term for a person who uses Twitter.

    Are they a Twitterer or Twitters?

  21. Hi there – thanks to @bentrem (on twitter that is), just found out that I’d made the list at #15. Thanks for that! For some reason, my normal radar sweep didn’t find this post. Hmm.

    One quick correction though – “Market IQ” is our quarterly research offering (IQ = Intelligence Quarterly), not the name of my employer. Does make me feel good that people are reading our Market IQs though, so I’ll take that! :) (FYI – the Market IQ on Findability is coming up, last quarter was the Market IQ on Enterprise 2.0, and previous quarter, the Market IQ on Content Security)

    I work at AIIM (http://www.aiim.org), or if you prefer, in AIIM Market Intelligence, if you could update that and re-sort, I’d really appreciate it. Helps keep our president and the marketing folks happy with me.

    Cheers (and thanks again!),
    Dan

  22. Hi Johnny,

    You may wish to consider adding my tweets http://twitter.com/mgrey — also noted in Carter’s directory.

    Thanks for the list, great resource,
    – Maurene

    P.S. Insofar as your question as to proper name for someone who submits tweets… doesn’t seem to be a consensus. However, “twitterer” appears to be most often used. Check out this site http://tinyurl.com/29ghzl for more than you want to know about Twitter.

  23. Thanks for all the helpful insights here. This has shown that their is some solid research ready to back up anyone who praises Twitter

  24. This is a fantastic resource and I firmly believe Twitter is the way forward in establishing greater relationships with peers and engaging with new audiences.

    Kudos to all involved.

    http://www.twitter.com/litmanlive

  25. It would be great if these analysts were organized in a Twitter List so interested parties could follow the group without having to follow each individually (Here’s my post on the new List feature – http://sherilarsen.com/2009/11/10/using-twitters-new-lists-feature/)


  1. 1 Some Interesting Twitter Tidbits: Analysts & Rules : Alexia Golez
  2. 2 People Over Process » links for 2008-05-06
  3. 3 Random notes on Twitter « SageCircle Blog
  4. 4 Giving it away for free to earn your keep « Curiously Persistent
  5. 5 The Twitter Effect on Blogging » Delusions of Adequacy
  6. 6 The Twitter Effect on Blogging « Delusions of Adequacy
  7. 7 Cómo Sacarle Provecho a Twitter
  8. 8 What Tweeple Use Twitter For… | Twitter Profile Creation
  9. 9 Online PR technology trends | Sally Falkow | The Leading Edge » Blog Archive » Analysts are Using Twitter Too
  10. 10 Get More Out of Twitter: Top Posts, Links and Tools | Sheri Larsen's Flying Cloud
  11. 11 Página de Horus » Cómo Sacarle Provecho a Twitter
  12. 12 Ten Reasons Why Twitter Rocks | HaveMacWillBlog (aka Robin Bloor’s Blog)
  13. 13 Graeme Thickins On Tech Start-Ups and Web 2.0 | IT's About Uptime - The StackSafe Blog
  14. 14 21 Days to a more profitable blog - Day 5! Build your Twelcome page » Barbara Ling
  15. 15 Links - 16th June 2008 « Curiously Persistent
  16. 16 Top analyst twitterers / analyst twitter index « Technobabble 2.0
  17. 17 Join the best Twitter Conversations | ZaggedEdge.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 41 other followers

%d bloggers like this: